Insights Into Teens: Episode 33 “Time Management”

This week we’re talking about time management and how best to utilize what limited time we have to accomplish the most number of things in the most efficient way. We look at the different types of time management personalities, discuss the advantages of time management and explore different time management techniques and how they can help you with school work, projects and to manage your time more efficiently.

Insights Into Teens

Transcription

Speaker 1: 00:01 Insightful podcast by informative hopes, insights into a podcast network.

Speaker 2: 00:26

Speaker 3: 00:26 Welcome to insights into teens, a podcast series, exploring the issues and challenges of today’s youth. Your hosts are Joseph and Madison. Whale is a father and daughter team making their way through the challenges of the teenage years.

Speaker 2: 00:50

Speaker 4: 00:51 Welcome to insights into teens. This is episode 33 time management. I’m your host, Joseph Waylon and my vibrant and intelligent cohost, Madison Waylon. Hi everyone. How are you doing this week Manny? Pretty good. So this was our first full week of full days of new school, right? Yup. How’d you make out this week? Really good. Good. I mean, major problems, not that I know of in Lake it so far. Starting to, yes. Good. That’s a good, that’s a good sign. So this week we’re going to be talking about time management. And when I had prepared the show notes, it was under the guise of helping you manage school time and schoolwork and stuff like that. But really time management can be used in any walk of life. I use it all the time at work for project management and for managing. My staff and so forth. So time management is a useful tool everyone can use, but we’re going to look at it from the perspective mainly of teens and schoolwork and so forth. Alrighty. So shall we get into it? We show over, right?

Speaker 4: 02:13 So the first thing we’re going to do is sort of define time management. So this comes from a website called mind tools. The definition that they have for time management is the process of organizing and planning. How to divide your time between specific activities. Good time management enables you to work smarter, not harder so that you get more done in less time, even when time is tight and pressures are high. Failing to manage your time damages your effectiveness and causes stress. Something we know we all suffer from that we try to minimize. Yeah. So tell me what, what do you know of time and, and minimizing stress for time management?

Speaker 5: 03:04 Well, I know when my new school that you have to actually use time management because you don’t, like before you didn’t have as long of a period as you do now. Like you have a shorter period than you did before. And I know now that you have to do time management for when you’re doing quizzes and tests. Oh, I’m going to doing schoolwork.

Speaker 4: 03:29 So how does time management help you, at least from what you’ve seen so far with handling those things?

Speaker 5: 03:35 Well, I know it has kept me more Oregon. I’ve noticed it kept being more organized and I’m able to get things done in a quicker amount of time.

Speaker 4: 03:46 Okay. Yeah, that’s definitely one way to do it and allows you to maximize your, your the resources that you have to be more effective. So let’s go through and take a look at some different types of time managers.

Speaker 6: 04:01 .

Speaker 4: 04:06 So this section of information comes from a website called education connections, educational connector connections, tutoring, if I could speak this morning. So they classify time managers in two types. Type one are kids with what they call a loud internal clock who have a fabulous sense of time and can self monitor how long things are taking and make adjustments. These are the kids where their alarm clock goes off at 7:00 AM in the morning, they’re able to shower, eat breakfast, and get out the door to meet the bus at 8:00 AM without fail. That’s type one. Type two kids with soft internal clocks who struggled to be on time, maintain deadlines and plan ahead appropriately. These kids are much less aware of passing time and are usually the kid you have to poke, prod and micromanage to get the, to make sure they get out the door on time in the morning and sometimes even have to drive them because they’re late. So let me ask you, which type do you think you are based on those two definitions?

Speaker 5: 05:26 I think I’m actually the, I’m closer to the first definition.

Speaker 4: 05:30 And why is that?

Speaker 5: 05:31 Well, for one, since I get up at five 50 in the morning, I I’ve actually been used to it because I at my old school, when I went to the aftercare, I would have to get up at six 20 and have to meet a specific deadline. Right. And I’ve been used to it for my entire life. Basically, and now it’s just like earlier in the morning and then I and then and then I just have to get, get the bus.

Speaker 4: 05:59 Yeah. And I think that’s important. You know, habit and we’ll talk about time management techniques in a little bit, but habit is one of those things. Now do you think that you plan ahead as well to help with your time management?

Speaker 5: 06:17 Well, I’ve noticed that for whenever I get homework I would like split it up into sections. Like I do the easy ones first because you guys were at home and the harder ones I do later. And if I needed your help I’d ask you guys when you got home.

Speaker 4: 06:38 Yeah, that’s, that’s a brilliant example of time management there is knowing how to separate the dance and doing most efficiently now it’s important. Handling time management, knowing which type of time manager you are is very important because that’s going to dictate what type of techniques work best for you. What might work best for a type one doesn’t necessarily work best for a type two. There are many benefits to time management. So we’ll come back and we’ll talk about those benefits real quick just to sort of put things into perspective. Okay. So the website very well, family.com tells us that high school can be very busy, but the adult world can be even busier. So it’s important to start teaching your team how to manage his time, his or her time. Now we will enjoy immediate benefits such as the following. Can you tell me if you get any of these benefits from time management, reduced anxiety when projects are doing school or test dates are approaching based on your time management techniques. Do you find that to be a benefit for you?

Speaker 5: 07:54 Well, like whenever I got a project or anything like that, I would always bring it to you guys so we could figure out how to manage the time. And I’ve noticed for when we have to do reading projects that I basically split up the the the shepard. Yeah, the trap. Like I would read part of the book every day and then I would like answer questions on it. The next couple, the end have days like that.

Speaker 4: 08:22 Yeah. Well, and that’s sort of like what you did with your summer reading, where you looked at how many pages you had to do, you looked at how many days you had off at at that point in time. It was just a mathematical equation as to how to deal with it.

Speaker 5: 08:34 Yeah. Cause they wanted to like spread the book out. I wouldn’t read the book like for the first five days and then just be done with it because I’d probably more than likely forget it. Most of it. So splitting it up actually not only reduces the stress but can also help you have a bet, a better memory.

Speaker 4: 08:53 That’s a very good point. So you’re it consistently throughout the summer so that that information is still fresh in your memory. That’s a very good point. Yup. The next benefit that they talk about is increased responsibility and independence. Does this time management give you that feeling of independence?

Speaker 5: 09:12 Yes, actually because I would normally come home and since you guys wouldn’t be home yet, I would immediately go straight to my homework after calling you guys and getting a quick snack look. And with time management it made me feel more responsible because I was able to met because I was able to manage my time and, and and a good manner.

Speaker 4: 09:35 And the other thing with that is with the responsibility and the independence that you get from it, there’s also, and I’m sure you’ve experienced this already, there’s a certain amount of pride and satisfaction that you take from, from getting that responsibility and independence and for filling those responsibilities. Like you’ve, you’ve sort of earned it at that point in time when you can do it yourself, you know, you’re not leaning on someone else. So the next thing they talk about is better decision making skills. And I think what we’ve talked about already sorta supports this with your approach to it. But do you think that your decision making skills have improved since you started using the time management techniques?

Speaker 5: 10:19 I mean I think so. Cause like as I said earlier, like deciding what homework I do first and what homework I will do last. I definitely think it’s helped me make better decisions and more responsible decisions. Like I’m, I’m starting to eat healthier snacks like tomatoes and fruits when I get home instead of like just forging for candy and stuff. Sure.

Speaker 4: 10:46 And the other thing is, and you’ve sort of demonstrated this already, is when you get home, the first thing that you do is tackle your homework. You don’t sit down and watch TV or play video games or something like that. So that alone is a sign of very good decision making.

Speaker 5: 11:02 And I just want to say for thing, if I get homework on a Friday, I immediately do it when I get home. I will not wait till the last second on Sunday to do my homework. I will not do that. You can not make me do that

Speaker 4: 11:16 Well On. That kind of puts that, that pressure on you all, all weekend long. So you don’t really get to enjoy the weekend either. Yeah. So more time for family and friends. Do you find that your time management allows you more free time since you’re more efficient?

Speaker 5: 11:32 Yeah, I can definitely say so. Like after I do my homework, I’ve, no, I notice that I have a bunch of free time to like do whatever I would normally do for in my free time. And I definitely really appreciate that because if like back to the homework example on Fridays, like if like just didn’t do the homework immediately on Friday and just waited like did some on Saturday, Sunday and Friday like that. I mean I know it might work for some people but I would have a lot less free time unless I like just banged it out on Friday.

Speaker 4: 12:11 Absolutely. What about better performance at school? Do you think time management is helping you improve your schoolwork?

Speaker 5: 12:19 Yeah, because it’s actually stopped getting my anxiety going up because I remember before I use time management, I was always stressing and you can probably, you probably know that period of time where I basically couldn’t handle anything that was going on. And until I started using time management, I was basically an emote emotional wreck who had no idea what she was doing.

Speaker 4: 12:42 And we’ve done podcasts on that too.

Speaker 5: 12:44 Yup. And I also think the podcast also helped with that.

Speaker 4: 12:48 So you’ve mentioned this already with the, the other benefit they talk about here is more opportunities to relax and unwind, which is what you alluded to in getting your, your school worked on and having more free time. Yeah. so I think that’s, that’s a good list of benefits that, that we have for time management and, and most of which you’re already benefiting from now, which is great. Yeah. so we’ll come back with some, a essential steps towards good time management that parents can teach.

Speaker 6: 13:23 Okay.

Speaker 4: 13:26 Teens usually have a fairly structured schedule, their school day and their afterschool activities are planned down for them as a result. Many of them don’t learn how to manage their time wisely when they have some downtime. So here’s some skills that you as a parent, and I’m speaking to, the audience, can teach your team to s a manage their time skills, improve their time, skill management. So the first one they talk about here is modeled good time management habits. So if you’re always running late or you miss a lot of deadlines, your team will follow suit. So it’s lead by example here. Practice managing your own time wisely and show your team that you can accomplish the most important tasks in any given day. And that’s one of the things that I try to do as well. And like, you know, on the weekends we kind of have a game thing going into the weekend. We know what we’re going to do, we kind of know when we’re going to do it.

Speaker 5: 14:28 Yeah. But we don’t know where we’re going to eat for lunch. No, that’s always up for grabs. Yeah.

Speaker 4: 14:34 But like if we sort of know where we’re going on the weekends, we kind of have an idea how long it’s going to take to get to wherever we’re going, when we need to start getting ready for when we need to be out the door. And these are all habits because mommy and I both are in fields of work that require us to utilize time management skills. We’re both fairly well versed in it. So we’re pretty good at planning things out and knowing how to time things. And by us doing that, you in turn see that and hopefully it’s just sort of passed onto you by Osmosis.

Speaker 5: 15:10 I mean to be honest, I actually haven’t really missed any of my classes by being late. I have been able to get my work done as quickly as I can and I think I’m pretty good with deadlines.

Speaker 4: 15:23 Tend to agree you don’t really have any problems.

Speaker 5: 15:26 And to be honest, whenever I have to have mommy signed something and like it’s on the weekend and then she decides to sign it on Sunday, I’m like, just do

Speaker 4: 15:37 Does that, doesn’t know you yet. So the next thing, give your teens time management tools, whether it’s a planner that your teen writes everything in or an app that manages your team’s schedule, helped your team find the tools that will work best for him or her. Talk about the importance of creating a schedule and using lists of prioritize their time wisely. Now, this isn’t something that we’ve actively done yet. However, we have taken great pains to provide you with the technological means in which to do this. It’s just a matter of us sitting down and showing you that, hey, if you put the schedule in on your phone or on your iPad and you wear your watch during the day, your watch will chime and let you know when these things need to get done, when you need to do this and so forth. So that’s something that’s going to be the next step in what we’ve been sort of putting the foundation in place for here to help you organize your time. I kind of wanted to wait to see how things went and you’re doing fantastic at this point in time, so I really don’t want to sort of rock the boat by implementing anything else until you actually need some additional help.

Speaker 5: 16:54 Yeah, I’ve actually been pretty good. I actually don’t need to use the one little note thing mommy gave me on the first day where like tells you where my classes are and when I need to go. Now I can basically go to my glasses with ease.

Speaker 4: 17:08 And that is a great segue into the next little helping tool here. Oh, they say encourage your team to write down their schedule. Your team’s time may easily get taken up with video games or social media if they’re not careful. Teach them to schedule their day so that you can set aside the time for chores, homework, and other responsibilities. Encourage them to schedule free time as well. So time doesn’t idly pass without feeling like they’ve done anything fun. And I think that’s, you know what mommy gave you that one little note that she gave you was the first step to that. But I think we sort do this kind of in a semi formal but informal way. Like we have the calendar, the dry erase calendar for the kitchen. So any appointments, any trips, anything like that goes on that calendar. So you always have that constant reminder by the refrigerator.

Speaker 4: 18:06 Yeah. The other thing that we do is, you know, you don’t make play dates with your friends, but you kind of know, all right, Sunday we’re going here. So Saturday we have to do this stuff in the morning, like the podcasts and stuff. And then after that we can go do something. I can go do something with my friends. So you kind of have that, that on official schedule in place already, which is good. And then it helps you manage your time efficiently. So the next thing they talk about is help your team prioritize activities. It’s common for teams to have conflicts in their schedules. A basketball game, birthday party or church activity may all coincide. Talk to your teen about how to prioritize activities based on their values and commitments. And again, that’s sort of where that calendar comes in, where we sort of, you know, like mommy has things that she does and you do. And I do. And you know, when we’re doing family things, we kind of need to make sure we’re all on the same calendar, on the same schedule there so that, that we can all have time together. Yeah. So I think we do a pretty good job with that. Yeah, avoid nagging. Just do I nag?

Speaker 5: 19:26 I don’t even know. I don’t really know what

Speaker 4: 19:28 Like to like stay on top of your, hey can you do this? Did you do this? Did you finish this? Did you do that type of thing.

Speaker 7: 19:35

Speaker 4: 19:36 Only when it comes to laundry.

Speaker 5: 19:37 Yup. Honestly, when it comes to my George, that’s when you really doing it right with homework and actually with projects and cleaning that basically the only time where you do it, you don’t really need to do it on homework cause you know how insane I am about it. Absolutely.

Speaker 4: 19:56 So they say it can be tempting to Nag your team or offer repeat reminders, but telling your team to do their homework or their chores over and over again reduces the responsibility. Set rules about your expectations and follow through with consequences when necessary. When your team will learn to manage his time, then your team will learn to manage their time better. Now we did do this. Remember early on when you started doing the, the chores there were times that, you know, you didn’t do them or you didn’t do them in a timely fashion and I had to pick up the slack and do them and there were consequences. What’s the consequences of not doing your chores?

Speaker 5: 20:41 You don’t get paid.

Speaker 4: 20:42 Exactly. So the advantage that I have with the chores is there’s a risk reward to doing the chores.

Speaker 5: 20:51 Yeah. Honestly, I’ve kind of gotten used to it now. It’s basically just like wake up early on a Sunday morning and just stowed the chores. It only takes like 20 minutes now. And honestly, I’ve kind of gotten used to it since. I’ve been doing it for over a year now.

Speaker 4: 21:05 That’s pretty good. And for the record, if it only takes about 20 minutes and you get 20 bucks for it, you’re making 60 bucks an hour, which is pretty darn good. Yeah. So just for the record set limits on electronics. Ooh, that’s a dirty idea there isn’t it? We haven’t done this yet.

Speaker 5: 21:25 I don’t think there’s really any.

Speaker 4: 21:28 Now of course you wouldn’t think there is a need for it. Right?

Speaker 5: 21:30 Well I know not for homework cause you know, immediately as I get home I’m like, yeah, I’m mark.

Speaker 4: 21:35 No complaints about homework. You’re right. Other things at the dinner table or when we’re out to eat at the dinner table or you know, just general downtime. Your team may waste countless hours on social media or playing video games if they’re not careful.

Speaker 5: 21:56 One thing is I don’t use social media just saying

Speaker 4: 22:00 Establish rules.

Speaker 5: 22:01 And to be honest, I don’t really play video games that much anymore

Speaker 4: 22:04 That help them create healthy habits with their cell phone and other devices. So you don’t play, Gosh, life

Speaker 5: 22:12 That is not a video game is a video game. It is a mobile game. It is a painful, oh my.

Speaker 4: 22:19 A video. A mobile game is a video game. Don’t try to draw distinctions there. Oh my Lord. Encourage your team to set goals. Talk to your teen about personal goals they want to reach. Then help them identify how much time they’ll need to work on that goal each day. Whether they want to exercise for 30 minutes, three times each week or they decide to apply for scholarships on Saturday afternoon each month. Goal setting is a great way to help them manage their time. So goal oriented. I totally agree with that.

Speaker 5: 23:00 Yeah, and you probably already know my goal, which my goal would smash him hard for some, but won’t probably won’t be hard for me staying a straight a student.

Speaker 4: 23:11 Wow, you’re, you’re beautiful, brilliant and modest. All in one. Look at that. Good job. Patting yourself on the back there. Gee, how about we come back with some time management tips. Alrighty.

Speaker 4: 23:29 So for this we go back to our favorite site, teen teen advisor. They say one thing that accompanies high school is the increase of independent time. And this is a problem for some students who have several extra curricular activities that they have to attend and loads of homework on top of them. Now you’re not in the extracurricular activities yet. I suspect that will change this year or as we move through your school career. Does it seem like there’s never enough time in the day to get everything done? I feel like you’re always running late. Here are some tips for taking control of your time and organizing your life. Now as we’ve discussed already, you’re pretty organized to begin with. So I don’t think a lot of these things necessarily apply to you, but this is more for the audience. See here? Yup. So there is a list of 10 things on here and we can probably bang through these pretty quick. All righty. So the first thing they say is make it to do list every day. I think that’s kind of excessive.

Speaker 5: 24:39 Yeah. Like you can do it for like, you can start off with a couple of days cause I don’t think like doing it every single day. It’s just gonna I think that’s just gonna cause more stress cause you might not remember.

Speaker 4: 24:53 Oh and I prefer having like a task list for the week.

Speaker 5: 24:56 Yeah. Like that would be

Speaker 4: 24:59 And easier way. Yeah. And like, I know what I need to do for the whole weekend, the things that I need to do by a certain time get priority. So doing it every day is kind of excessive and yeah, it can be a waste of time too if you’re, if you’re sort of doing the same thing over and over, but they say put things that are most important at the top of the list to do. Obviously. if it’s easier, use a planner to track all of your tasks and don’t forget to reward yourself for your accomplishments. And I think that’s the important thing here is if you get everything on your list, on Pat yourself on the back, you know, have a little treat, but make sure that you acknowledge your accomplishments there.

Speaker 5: 25:39 Yeah. Honestly, whenever I’m done with homework, I know like, okay, I can go watch youtube now. Yeah. Like that’s basically my role. Yeah,

Speaker 4: 25:47 That’s exactly it. Number two is use spare minutes wisely. I get some reading done on the bus ride home from school, for example. And you’ll kill two birds with one stone. So you know the downtime that you have in transit between one place to another, whether it’s on the weekend, whether it is back and forth to school, you know, you’ve got 20 minutes on the bus, use it wisely, study for the exam, read a couple extra pages of the book that you read, whatever it is, don’t just veg out and, and you know, doze off during the bus ride there saying hi and I get that.

Speaker 5: 26:27 Yeah. But I’ve noticed it’s hard to ride on the bus

Speaker 4: 26:30 Writing. Yes, I agree. And some people can get motion sick. There’s trying to read in a moving vehicle.

Speaker 5: 26:36 Yeah, I know I’ve done that when we have to go on vacation and I have a whole stack of homework. Right.

Speaker 4: 26:41 So you know, you gotta know what your limitations are. Yeah. Number three is it’s okay to say no. If your boss asks you to work on Thursday night and you have a final exam the next morning, realize that it’s okay to say no. Keep your short and longterm priorities in mind. Obviously that’s not a high school example there. Yeah. But you know, if you’ve got something, if you’ve got a project you’re working on over the weekend and it’s due on Monday, and your friends come knocking at the door, you got to say, no, I need to finish this before I can go out. So keeping priorities done, find the right time, you’ll work more efficiently if you figure out when you do your best work. For example, if your brain handles math better in the afternoon, don’t wait until late night to do it. So a lot of this might have to do with fatigue. A lot of it has to do with distractions. So for instance, you might be very good at doing math as long as there’s no distractions around. So you don’t want to do your math in an environment where the TV’s on or mommy and daddy are talking or something like that. You may need quiet time to do that.

Speaker 5: 27:52 Yeah. I remember whenever I had leftover homework and whenever you guys were talking, I would literally just go up in my room to hopefully do and not the noise.

Speaker 4: 28:00 Yeah. So you got to sort of know yourself. And what your environment is, review your notes every day. You’ll reinforce what you’ve learned soon. So you need less time to study. You’ll also be ready if your teacher calls on you to give at work as a pop quiz. Now it’s funny that that’s in this list at number five here when the idea of taking notes isn’t mentioned. Taking notes is very important. So as you’re sitting in class, one thing that studies have found is that by writing down thoughts, it helps you retain them better. So as your teacher is speaking to you in class about a lesson, write down key words, write down key phrases in a notebook. It doesn’t necessarily have to be complete sentences. It doesn’t have to be you know, paragraphs or anything or structured. But you know, as I, as someone who’s sitting here talking about time management, you might write down time management and you might write down, stop yawning when you’re in the middle of a podcast or something like that. You know, you could do any of those things. Write them down on a piece of paper. And then when you go back later, instead of reading over the entire lesson that was given that day, you can read over your notes and your notes will help you play out how that lesson was, was given to you during the day. So it’s a great way to study two different ways, but it also helps with your time management skills.

Speaker 5: 29:36 Also, we’re actually doing something similar to that called focus, which you basically like if like the teacher writes down something like you write down in porn parts in that highlight circle, stuff like that. Yeah, absolutely. Yeah.

Speaker 4: 29:52 And if you can mark up your notebooks or your, you’re gonna stop yawning. Oh mind if you can write down your, your things, your markup, your books, do that with highlighters and stuff like that. That’s a great way to go back when you’re studying and know the information you need to look at. Get a good nights sleep. Really. Did you get a good night’s sleep by the way?

Speaker 5: 30:17 Yes. Cause you’re young. I’m like crazy. Oh my Lord. I do it every time you make me feel like I’m boring it here. I am not. You are not boring me.

Speaker 4: 30:26 Alright, number six, get a good night’s sleep. Running on empty makes the day seem longer and your tasks seem more difficult. Don’t need to harp on that. We’ve talked about getting a good night’s sleep for quite some time now,

Speaker 5: 30:39 Even though words hasn’t really been that effective while you need to work on, that’s an area that you need improvement on. I know, along with social interaction

Speaker 4: 30:48 That true. Yes. A number seven, communicate your schedule to others. If phone calls are proving to be a distraction, tell your friends you take social calls from seven to 8:00 PM. It may sound silly, but it helps. Basically. Don’t bother me it between these two hours, because I’m working.

Speaker 5: 31:10 Thing is, I don’t call my friends. I know, but your friends do

Speaker 4: 31:13 Come over on the weekends occasionally. So it’s good for them to know, hey, I don’t, I can’t come out until such and such time. I know and I can start hanging out with friends after school. Same thing, you know? But it’ll be less, you know, that’ll be less of an issue for you than for them because you’ll probably have had time to get all your work done. Yeah. number eight, become a master of your time. Figure out how much free time you have each week. Give yourself a time budget and playing your activities accordingly. Very basic time management skills there. Yeah. Number nine, and this is a good one for you. Don’t waste time worrying or you ever wasted an entire evening by worrying about something that you’re supposed to be doing.

Speaker 5: 32:01 And was it worth it really instead of agonizing and procrastinating? Just do it. Well, I didn’t, I don’t, I don’t really procrastinate. I just worry a lot.

Speaker 4: 32:14 Just don’t, you know, be prepared, you know, know the information, know the subject matter, know the, you know, for school no what the map the high school looks like and just throw yourself into it and deal with them. Yup. And the last one that they have here is don’t push yourself way too much. Setting goals that are unrealistic, set you up for failure. That’s another important one to understand. While it’s good to set high goals for yourself. Be sure not to overdo it, set goals that are difficult yet reachable. And to add to that, I will also say that makes sure that when you set your goals, if you have a big lofty goal that you want to accomplish, like I don’t know, getting straight A’s, well instead of shooting to get straight A’s, take that goal and then break it up into smaller objectives, you know?

Speaker 4: 33:16 Alright, so I need to get past this marking period here and this, do this project and do this and do that and take that big objective that you have. Break it in the smaller, more achievable goals that lead ultimately to that end goal. So instead of, you know, thinking, oh my goodness, I have to climb this entire mountain set break points along the way for that mountain. So as you accomplish those things, they’re working towards the ultimate goal, but you also have a point to say, alright, I got this far. Let me start, let me take a breath. Let me pat myself on the back. All right, let’s move on more. And that’s how you sort of accomplish goals in a timely manner without getting overwhelmed. They sum up by saying, consider these tips, but personalize your habits so that they suit you. If you set priorities that fit your lifestyle, you’ll have a better chance of achieving your goals. And based on this discussion alone, I think you’re probably in a pretty good position with your time management at this point in time.

Speaker 5: 34:24 Yeah, the one, one of the things I’m actually okay with instead of having to work on, I’m actually pretty good with this one.

Speaker 4: 34:31 Well and I think a lot of that comes from just years of getting there. I mean, we didn’t have time management, you know, from the time you were born. This is, these are acquired skills that you learn over time and, and as you use those and exercise those skills, you get better at them and you get more efficient. So Kudos to you. Yeah. I think that was all that I had this week. I think we’ll come back, we’ll get your closing remarks in any shout outs that you might have Joe for closing remarks.

Speaker 5: 35:12 Alrighty. So for everyone in the audience out there who has problems with time managing just remember that time management isn’t a waste of time while look, pun intended. Wow. That was pretty good. I like that. And it it would be, it’s very important to have time management so that you have not only it be good for school but it will be good for other things in life because as you said earlier, daddy time management will be used and pretty much every scenario by almost everyone.

Speaker 4: 35:48 That’s true. That’s it. That’s pretty much it. Any shout outs?

Speaker 5: 35:52 I guess I’ll give a shout out to you to daddy because you helped me with my time management and I’m pretty sure I would not have, I would not be as good with time management if it wasn’t for your help. You were the one who taught me break things down by how easy and difficult they are.

Speaker 4: 36:09 Awesome. Glad I was able to help and I think that is all we had this week. Just a reminder, you can get the audio version of the podcast@podcastsdotinsightsintheteens.com you can get us a video wise on youtube.com/insights into things. You can visit us on Facebook at facebook.com/insights into things, podcasts, or you can hit us up on our own website@wwwdotinsightsintothings.com and I think that’s it. Anything else? Not that I know of. All right, we are out. Bye.

Show Notes

  • Introduction
    • Episode 28: “Time Management”
       
  • What is Time Management
    • Mind tools
    • https://www.mindtools.com/pages/article/newHTE_00.htm
      • “Time management” is the process of organizing and planning how to divide your time between specific activities. Good time management enables you to work smarter – not harder – so that you get more done in less time, even when time is tight and pressures are high. Failing to manage your time damages your effectiveness and causes stress.
         
  • Types of Time Managers
    • Educational Connections Tutoring
    • https://www.ectutoring.com/time-management-for-teens
      • Type 1: Kids with a loud internal clock, who have a fabulous sense of time, and can self-monitor how long things are taking and make adjustments.

        These are the kids where if their alarm clock goes off at 7am in the morning, they’re able to shower, eat breakfast, and get out the door to meet the bus at 8am without fail.
         
      • Type 2: Kids with a soft internal clock: who struggle to be on time, maintain deadlines, and plan ahead appropriately.

        These kids are much less aware of passing time, and are usually the kid you have to poke, prod, and micro-manage to get the to make sure they’re out the door on time in the morning (and sometimes you even have to drive them because they’re late!).

        This concept comes from my friend Ari Tuckman, a psychologist who works with adults with ADHD, and it almost perfectly describes the kids we see all the time. And without fail, it’s the kids with the soft internal clock the we need strong routines and strategies to help manage their time more effectively.
  • Benefits of Time Management
    • Verywell Family.com
    • https://www.verywellfamily.com/teaching-time-management-skills-to-teens-2608794
      • High school can be very busy. But the adult world can be even busier. So it’s important to start teaching your teen how to manage his time now. He’ll enjoy immediate benefits such as:
        • Reduced anxiety when projects are due in school or test dates are approaching.
        • Increased responsibility and independence.
        • Better decision-making skills.
        • More time for family and friends.
        • Better performance at work and school.
        • More opportunities to relax and unwind.
        • Steps Parents Can Take to Teach Time Management Skills
           
  • Essential Steps Towards Good Time Management Parents can Teach
    • Teens usually have fairly structured schedules. Their school day and their after-school activities are planned out for them. As a result, many of them don’t learn how to manage their time wisely when they have some downtime. Here are some steps you can take to teach your teen essential time management skills:
       
      • Model good time management habits. If you’re always running late or you miss a lot of deadlines, your teen will follow suit. Practice managing your own time wisely and show your teen that you can accomplish the most important tasks in any given day.
         
      • Give your teen time management tools. Whether it’s a planner that your teen writes everything in or an app that manages your teen’s schedule, help your teen find the tools that will work best for him. Talk about the importance of creating a schedule and using lists to prioritize his time wisely.
         
      • Encourage your teen to write down his schedule. Your teen’s time may easily get taken up with video games or social media if he’s not careful. Teach him to schedule his day so he can set aside time for chores, homework, and other responsibilities. Encourage him to schedule free time as well, so time doesn’t idly pass without feeling like he hasn’t done anything fun.
         
      • Help your teen prioritize activities. It’s common for teens to have conflicts in their schedules. A basketball game, birthday party, and church activity may all coincide. Talk to your teen about how to prioritize activities, based on his values and commitments.
         
      • Encourage your teenager to develop routines. Encourage your teen to establish healthy habits, like doing his chores right after school. Once he gets into the routine of doing things in a certain order, he won’t have to waste time thinking about what to do next.
         
      • Avoid nagging. It can be tempting to nag your teen or offer repeat reminders. But, telling your teen to do his homework or his chores over and over again, reduces his responsibility. Set rules about your expectations and follow through with consequences when necessary. Then, your teen will learn to manage his time better in the future.
         
      • Set limits on electronics. Your teen may waste countless hours on social media or playing video games if she’s not careful. Establish rules that help her create healthy habits with her cellphone and other digital devices.
         
      • Encourage her to set goals. Talk to your teen about personal goals she wants to reach. Then, help her identify how much time she’ll need to work on that goal each day. Whether she wants to exercise for 30 minutes 3 times each week or she decides to apply for scholarships one Saturday afternoon each month, goal setting is a great way to help her manage her time.
         
  • Time Management Tips
    • Teen Advisor
    • http://www.teensadvisor.com/teen-schooling/time-management.html
    • One thing that accompanies high-school is the increase of independent time and this is a problem for some students who have several extracurricular activities that they attend and loads of homework on top of them. Does it seem like there’s never enough time in the day to get everything done? Feel like you’re always running late? Here are some tips for taking control of your time and organizing your life.
       
      1. Make a “To Do” List Every Day:  Put things that are most important at the top and do them first. If it’s easier, use a planner to track all of your tasks. And don’t forget to reward yourself for your accomplishments.
         
      2. Use Spare Minutes Wisely:  Get some reading done on the bus ride home from school, for example, and you’ll kill two birds with one stone.
         
      3. It’s Okay to Say “No.”: If your boss asks you to work on a Thursday night and you have a final exam the next morning, realize that it’s okay to say no. Keep your short- and long-term priorities in mind.
         
      4. Find the Right Time:  You’ll work more efficiently if you figure out when you do your best work. For example, if your brain handles math better in the afternoon, don’t wait to do it until late at night.
         
      5. Review Your Notes Every Day: You’ll reinforce what you’ve learned, so you need less time to study. You’ll also be ready if your teacher calls on you or gives a pop quiz.
         
      6. Get a Good Night’s Sleep: Running on empty makes the day seem longer and your tasks seem more difficult.
         
      7. Communicate Your Schedule to Others: If phone calls are proving to be a distraction, tell your friends that you take social calls from 7:00 to 8:00 p.m. It may sound silly, but it helps.
         
      8. Become a master of your time: Figure out how much free time you have each week. Give yourself a time budget and plan your activities accordingly.
         
      9. Don’t Waste Time Worrying: Have you ever wasted an entire evening by worrying about something that you’re supposed to be doing? Was it worth it? Instead of agonizing and procrastinating, just do it.
         
      10. Don’t Push Yourself Way Too Much: Setting goals that are unrealistic sets you up for failure. While it’s good to set high goals for yourself, be sure not to overdo it. Set goals that are difficult yet reachable.
         

Consider these tips, but personalize your habits so that they suit you. If you set priorities that fit your lifestyle, you’ll have a better chance of achieving your goals.
 

  • Closing Remarks and Shoutouts

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