Insights Into Teens: Episode 13 “Pets”

This week we explore the wonders, benefits and rewards of the furry, feathered and scaled members of the family folks refer to as our pets. We look at reasons why people keep pets, the benefits teens gain from their pets and the health benefits we all get from our pets. We’ll also take a look at some interesting statistics on pets to better understand their impact on us and then we’ll introduce you to our pets. Another great podcast!

Insights Into Teens

Episode Transcript

Speaker 1:
0:08
Insightful pocket by informative, a podcast network. Okay.:
Speaker 2:
0:33
Welcome to insights into teens, a podcast series, exploring the issues and challenges of today’s youth. Your hosts are Joseph and Madison Wireless, a father and daughter team making their way through the challenges,:
Speaker 1:
0:48
the teenage years.:
Speaker 3:
0:58
Welcome to insights into teens. This is episode 13. Pets. I’m your host, Joseph Whalen, along with my lovely and talented cohost, Madison Whalen. Hello everyone. Hello Madison. How are you doing today? I’m doing quite well. Good, good. Today we’re going to have a little bit of fun. We’re going to talk about pets that plays such a vital role in our lives and, uh, kind of have an easy day today. Yeah. So a couple of things we’re going to talk about. We are going to look at why do people keep pets. Uh, then we’ll look at what are the benefits of pets to teens. Uh, then we’ll look at some of the health benefits that pets afford us. And then there are some interesting statistics on pets that we’ll talk about. And finally we’ll talk about, uh, your pets and the impact that they have on your life. And then we’ll close up with your closing remarks and shout outs. So are you ready?:
Speaker 4:
2:09
Yup.:
Speaker 3:
2:16
So the first thing we’re going to start off with is why do people keep pets? Someone doing research for this week’s podcast? Uh, I checked out a site called pets keepers, guy.com, I think at a very, a simple reason for it. They say, uh, pets. Uh, people have pets for various reasons. Some people keep pets because of their physical attractiveness, some for their playfulness and other unique personalities and characteristics while others keep pets for companionship. So we have pets. Yup. Right. How many pets do we have to re and what do we have? We have three cats. And why do we have pets?:
Speaker 5:
3:03
Well, mainly because mommy and I both love cats. I don’t really know if you play a big part in it too, as you’re allergic to cats.:
Speaker 3:
3:11
Well, I don’t play a big part in it. You know, one of those cats kind of did adopt me. Yup. Okay. So that’s a pretty good reason. Now we have, um, because we loved them. We have them. What, for companionship?:
Speaker 5:
3:26
Well, yes.:
Speaker 3:
3:28
Did you know that there are other benefits that you get from pets other than just keeping your company? Nope, I did not. Well, we’re going to have to talk about those. So this is insights in a teen. So the first thing we’re going to look at is what benefits teens tend to get from pets.:
Speaker 4:
3:49
Okay.:
Speaker 3:
3:54
So, uh, this information actually came from oprah.com a site hosted, uh, on behalf of a for Winfrey. Um, and it’s, it’s a bolded list of features or, or I guess benefits that teens get from pets. And I want to run down these and see if any of these apply to you or do you think they apply to you. Okay. Okay. So the first one that we have is, uh, children who grow up in homes with pets have less risk of developing common allergies and asthma. Are you aware of that?:
Speaker 5:
4:32
No, I’m not learned that that is actually possible.:
Speaker 3:
4:36
I think part of that is because your body starts developing immunities to these things and it builds, its defense is kind of like when kids go to, to preschool and they were exposed to germs. And her body’s built up an immunity. So, ah, um, I can speak firsthand from this because I was extremely allergic to cats, um, prior to mommy and I meeting each other and exposure over a decade to Katz has made me less allergic to them. Uh, I’m not immune to them unfortunately. Yeah. Um, the next thing they have is playing with dogs may help lower blood pressure. And I think this is probably more to do with the exercise that you get from dogs. Yeah. You don’t get a lot of exercise from cats day? Nope. Um, aside from, you know, cleaning up after them, maybe, maybe. So what do you do with a cat that would constitute exercise?:
Speaker 5:
5:37
Um, ah, no, maybe chasing after them if they tried to run out of the house.:
Speaker 3:
5:43
Does that happen a lot with your cats?:
Speaker 5:
5:45
No, we never really, well her mom anymore. I did always have to keep an eye on Dorian:
Speaker 3:
5:49
are:
Speaker 5:
5:50
oldest cat when we had to get her back in because she was trying to cross the street and I had to always keep her back in.:
Speaker 3:
6:01
Well, she did like her freedom, that’s for sure. Yep. So the next thing that they have on the list here was kids with pants go outside more to go for walks, run and play and enjoy all the associated health benefits somehow. I don’t think this one applies to you.:
Speaker 5:
6:19
Yeah, it doesn’t. Well, before when Dorian was allowed outside and she was like, almost a stranger would always hang out by us, I would go outside occasionally and have a little fun with her. I’d pet her, we’d go on the grass together. We’d have just fun.:
Speaker 3:
6:34
Yeah. Well, and I know when we would go out to walk and stuff, we’d walk around the neighborhood. She’d follow us around to, um, but we weren’t getting exercise because of her. She was getting exercise because of us. Yeah. Uh, pet owners require fewer doctors visits. Now the study didn’t really explain why. Um, I don’t know if it’s because of the exercise associated with it or not. Um,:
Speaker 1:
7:05
okay.:
Speaker 3:
7:06
And I don’t, I don’t really have a comparison because, you know, I’ve had, we’ve had pets here for quite some time now. Um,:
Speaker 1:
7:16
okay.:
Speaker 3:
7:16
Do you know of any kids now that have pets that go to the doctor’s last?:
Speaker 5:
7:23
No, I don’t.:
Speaker 3:
7:24
Okay. Well I know there are therapy animals and stuff like that that um, you know, have a medical purpose to people. Yeah. So, um, emerging.:
Speaker 1:
7:40
Okay.:
Speaker 3:
7:41
Oh, that’s interesting. I didn’t even read this one yet. Emerging readers, kids just starting to learn how to read often feel more comfortable reading aloud to a pet.:
Speaker 1:
7:53
Yeah.:
Speaker 3:
7:54
Like, like do you enjoy when you read, you don’t read out loud, right?:
Speaker 5:
7:57
Well, sometimes if I need help focusing, yes. I’m pretty sure when I was younger I would normally read to my cat, try cat fluffer and reset my passed away.:
Speaker 3:
8:07
Right. Yeah. So you’re more inclined because they don’t judge you, right? Yep. They don’t judge you. They don’t comment. They don’t make fun of you. Right. But basically they allow you to no matter what. And it’s a confidence builder. So nurturing a pet is an acceptable way for boys to parent play, to practice being caregivers. Now obviously this does not apply to me. This does not apply to you. Um, but it basically allows voice to do the same thing that girls tend to do when they play with dolls and stuff like that. Um, what else do we have here? Feeding and caring for a pet and carriage, his childhood responsibility. Was that something that you agree with?:
Speaker 5:
8:55
Yeah, I:
Speaker 3:
8:56
would say so because you’re basically taking care of another life and if you like feed it, take care of her, that it shows that you have responsibility and that you can take, take care of a pet base. And pretty much when a parent gets a pet efficiently because the kid, the kid is being responsible and the whole reason for, and the whole reason for getting the package because the kid wants it and they’re responsible enough to have one. Well, and you’re right, it’s very important because at that point in time that animal’s life is dependent on, it was entirely on the caregivers. It’s owning it at that point. So it’s very important that, um, you know, you have the responsibility to feed it and look after it and make sure it’s cleaned up for and everything else. Yup. Um, an interesting side note, a lot of, uh, young adults when they get into relationships, you know, prior to getting married and having kids, one of the first steps that they go through oftentimes is acquiring a pet and the ideas of the two of them can raise a pet together in a happy household and share responsibilities.:
Speaker 3:
10:11
It’s a good step towards having children getting a place of their own and stuff like that. So it’s an interesting stepping stone. Children with pets, display improved impulse control, social skills and self esteem. You think that’s, that helps you with your cats?:
Speaker 5:
10:32
I um, to be better able to talk to people.:
Speaker 3:
10:38
Oh, sure. That’s part of the social skills.:
Speaker 5:
10:41
Well, I do not. I do remember some moments where I will talk to my cats and um, whenever I try to like calm other people down, I’ve right or well, I guess that would help.:
Speaker 3:
10:56
Okay. Yeah. I mean it, it, it basically allows you to practice social skills again in a judgment free environment where the animal is not going to judge him. Sharing the love and care of a family pet forges an additional common bond amongst siblings. Uh, now unfortunately, while you do have a brother, he doesn’t live with us, so this isn’t something that you would probably be exposed to all that much. Um, this is one that I can speak from experience on because as a child we had a family dog. The family dog was supposed to be my brother’s dog. Um, but we were all responsible for making sure he was fed and had water and was cleaned and brushed and all that stuff. And um, you know, having that common goal, that common purpose, uh, allowed me to interact with my brothers in a way that I normally have interacted. Cuddling a pet reduces stress, loneliness and anxiety. How do you think about, what do you think about that?:
Speaker 5:
12:04
I definitely think that is true because sometimes when I like, like have a cat laying on me and I started petting it, I calmed down if I feel stressed or anxiety and I’d actually feel as though I wasn’t lonely.:
Speaker 3:
12:22
Yeah. And I had the tie. It’s, it’s funny, you know, cat’s really consents when you’re feeling sad or lonely or, or in the dumps or, yeah. Or even if you’re not feeling good. I mean, the cats, the cats migrate. Even, even, um, our one cat Liotta who was not a particularly social cat, you know, if I’m home sick from work and I’m downstairs on the couch not feeling well, she’ll come downstairs and sit with me just to provide some level of support. It’s, it’s quite amazing.:
Speaker 5:
12:53
Yeah. And after, I can’t, fluffer died who used to always sleep in my room with me and I was kind of cry and I was crying a lot. Dorianne wa Cat Dorian would come in my room and then she started sleeping with me at night and I felt comfortable.:
Speaker 3:
13:10
Yes. Dorian has a, has a very motherly instinct too, or I think just like fluff or did so. Very cool stuff. Yep. So next, let’s talk about some of the health benefits that, uh, pets provide us.:
Speaker 4:
13:26
Okay.:
Speaker 3:
13:32
So this information comes from India times.com. Let they say in a recent study, a recent study show that there are more pets than children in American households, which I thought was rather interesting. Keeping pets at home has several benefits and these include, uh, pets can enhance your mood. They say research research has shown that people who suffer from various diseases have lesser chances of depression if they keep pets as compared to those who are suffering with similar, similar Lee’s diseases and don’t keep pets. What are your thoughts on that?:
Speaker 5:
14:13
I definitely think that could be true because whenever I’m at home sick and I’m not feeling too well of the cats were the calm, like a cat would come and they would comfort me and I’d feel better. And I’m pretty sure you can relate to when you said, um, with Liotta she comes down when you’re stuck.:
Speaker 3:
14:36
Absolutely. Yeah. Yeah. They’re very good nurse maids. Yup. Uh, they help to control blood pressure. Health experts say the dog owners have less blood pressure and heart rates. Now they only mentioned that about owners. I don’t know about cat owners. Uh, I know our cats have a tendency of raising my blood pressure. Yeah. You know, because of the message they tend to make and uh, the itchy eyes that I get from them. Um, I don’t know. What do you think, do you think, do you think the calming effect that they give you health might help blood pressure maybe. Okay. I would, I would go with that as well. There are a source of exercise except our cats. I think, um, our cats don’t really get much exercise. Yeah. For them, a full day is waking up upstairs in a bedroom and walking downstairs and going back to sleep in the living room and,:
Speaker 5:
15:33
and then repeating the whole thing. Yeah. Occasionally getting a drink of water and eating.:
Speaker 3:
15:38
Yeah. They’re, they’re pretty much spent after that, so yeah, I think that’s probably more targeted towards dog owners and cat owners.:
Speaker 6:
15:46
MMM.:
Speaker 3:
15:47
The next point here is that they are an antidote for loneliness. Pets give you unconditional love and are always faithful. Again, this is one of those, they don’t judge you, they don’t complain. They don’t, you know, argue with you. Although I’m pretty sure sometimes the angry meow we get from Dorian is, is kind of an argument on a certain level. Yeah.:
Speaker 6:
16:12
MMM.:
Speaker 3:
16:13
But are they an antidote for loneliness, do you think?:
Speaker 5:
16:16
Yep. I can definitely say with confidence that they are definitely an antidote for loneliness.:
Speaker 3:
16:22
Are they his comfort from the cats? One of the things you search for when you’re feeling lonely? Yeah. Sometimes. Or is, is it one of those things where the cats know that you’re lonely or upset and they just, you know, seek you out?:
Speaker 5:
16:36
Well, both in both. Okay. Sometimes if I’m feeling lonely at them and I don’t feel like Logan for the cats, one of them will come in and comfort me if I want to go look for, oh, can I do and I just sat down, I’d pet them. Gotcha. Oh yeah.:
Speaker 3:
16:54
And they, and they let you do that at that point. Yup. Yeah. Long life. Several studies have revealed that people who tend to spend their time with pets are more likely to live longer than people who don’t. Um, I would definitely agree with this. I mean, you see,:
Speaker 6:
17:15
mmm.:
Speaker 3:
17:17
A lot of elderly people who have pets tend to be far less lonely, far more active and social, uh, and they tend to live longer lives.:
Speaker 6:
17:29
So yeah,:
Speaker 3:
17:30
cats can make you live longer. How’s that sound?:
Speaker 5:
17:33
Yeah, that really sounds as though it could be through:
Speaker 3:
17:38
better social skills. So kids who grow up with pets at home are always respectful towards living things. And that’s, you know, that’s, that’s an interesting take that they put on it there with social skills and respect for living things. Um, and I think a lot of that goes back to the responsibility when you learn, you know, how important it is for you to take care of that animal. You know, it’s a real uplifting experience I think. And then it makes you respect other things and not just pats, but people and plants and the earth and everything that’s alive. What do you think?:
Speaker 5:
18:17
Yeah, I can definitely see how that could work because like, um, if you don’t want, because if you yell at your cat, they’re probably gonna get upset and you then realize that if you do that to other people, your, yeah. It’s not any better.:
Speaker 3:
18:35
Yeah. Yeah. So it’s, it’s, it’s a life. It’s a good life lesson. How to handle other people too. And the last one they had on this a health benefit list was safety. Uh, no burglar alarm can be better than a dog. Okay. That’s debatable. Yeah. Um, do you get a sense of safety from having cats in the house?:
Speaker 5:
19:00
Sometimes if I have, like if I’m distracted or worried when they come over, I feel like it’s safe and calm and stuff like that.:
Speaker 3:
19:11
Um, but you know, dogs are dogs here, something they bark. Do you get any kind of early warning system with cats like that?:
Speaker 5:
19:20
Um, unless you count the Times that you’ve been woken up by cat scratching you on top of you. [inaudible]:
Speaker 3:
19:28
that’s usually because they’re hungry though. Yeah. All right. So maybe not too much safety coming out of cats, Dan. Yeah. All right, fair enough.:
Speaker 3:
19:43
So as with all things with our podcasts, we have statistics. Well, most things, yeah. We tried to do statistics because it helps to put things into perspective, I think. Yup. So we have a couple of different sites that we pulled from this week. A one site was Aye. Aye, aye.org, which I’m not really sure what that stands for. I have to cite here, but Oh, the insurance information institute, which was an interesting source I thought for getting information on paths, but they did have two things that stood out to me. Okay. So they say that about 68% of households or 85 million families own a pet in 2018 that’s a lot of pets in a lot of houses. Yup. Uh, they say this is up from 56%. So we went from 56 to 68%. Oh Wow. Since 1988. Wow. So there’s definitely a growing trend in people owning pets.:
Speaker 3:
20:50
And I guess it kind of makes sense coming from an insurance institute, um, because a lot of ways, pets or insurance concern, you hear about a dog’s biting people and stuff like that. We’ll usually, when that happens at someone’s house and you know, somebody sues or there’s medical, uh, bills or anything like that, it’s the insurance companies that have to deal with it. Uh, when we were living in an apartment, we had to pay a premium to have pets in the apartment because of the damage that they knew the cats we’re going to do to the walls and the carpet and stuff like that. So aside from the, the general care costs of animals, there’s that, you know, damage and, and potential harm that we have to worry about. But 85 million families have Pat’s, that’s pretty impressive. So the next set of steps of stats that we have here comes from a site that we use often stage of life.com. Oh yeah. Uh, so they say 91% of all teenagers and college students, uh, have or do own a pet. You think that’s Kinda high? Yup. Pretty high. I mean 91 percent’s a lot. What do you think the reasons are for that?:
Speaker 5:
22:16
Well, maybe like we said before, with all of the support, right? I maybe like to stop them from being lonely cause they’re probably away from home.:
Speaker 3:
22:29
I would buy that. Yeah, that’s a good one.:
Speaker 5:
22:32
Um, and they probably help and they are also probably help them reduce stress and they can like talk to them if they’re feeling sad or lonely. So,:
Speaker 3:
22:43
oh the next stack kind of goes hand in hand with that. 89% of students support animal rights. So again, it goes back to that, you know, there was learning the responsibility for caring for a pet gives you that sense of responsibility for all other things. Uh, the next one is 67% of teens preferred dogs over cats. Uh, clearly that is not the case in our household. Yup. Um, why do you think that would be the case? Okay.:
Speaker 5:
23:18
Um, maybe because when you have a dog, it’s more playful than my cat. But um, probably people hate cats because they think that they’re monsters because they always scratch up the couch and shit all over and they say, and they might think like dogs are better because you can actually play with them. They actually greet you when you get home and they’re basically just like one of your best friends.:
Speaker 3:
23:47
Yeah. That, you know, I think I would buy a part of that. I think, I think part of it is also the security. Yeah. Um, and I think part of it is the fact that dogs tend to be far more affectionate than cats do. Yup. Um, I mean, cats are affectionate on their own terms for a dogs are unconditionally affection and all the time basically. Yeah. So 38% of teens report, it’s sad to visit a zoo instead of fun. Let, so let me ask you two questions there. One is for you, is it San or fun to visit a zoo?:
Speaker 5:
24:29
Um, I guess more fun than sad for me. Okay. But I do do feel bad for some of the animals.:
Speaker 3:
24:39
So then that’s the next question. Why do you think these teens feel sad?:
Speaker 5:
24:44
Maybe because I don’t like sitting in the animals and prison and they’d prefer them to be out in the wild where they belong. They probably hate and having the animals and prison and they don’t like to see them in caves and, and slaved.:
Speaker 3:
25:00
Yeah. And I believe that. And I think the terminology that you use there might be a little harsh. Um, I mean a zoo was not a prison. They’re not enslaving the animals are not forcing him to do labor or anything. Um, I think a lot of times if, if many of these animals weren’t in a zoo, it would be dead. They would be dead. Because:
Speaker 5:
25:24
I’m, and I think these teens who say that don’t, might not realize it, right. But they probably don’t like just like having to see, um, animals in there. I, I really can’t describe that kind of feeling because I’ve never felt that kind of feeling.:
Speaker 3:
25:44
Yeah. And, and just different zoos are different. Like for instance, uh, the Philadelphia Zoo, um, a few years back, well of getting rid of their elephants because they didn’t have the land for the elephants and the elephants were to cooped up in a small area that they had. So they didn’t feel it was right for them to, to live under those conditions. So they send them off to another student, had more land. Um, but when we go down to say the Cape May Zoo for instance, you know, the Cape May zoo has a huge area that, that some of the larger animals can roam and grays and it’s much more conducive to their natural habitat. Um, but you know, some of these animals get, you know, they all get great medical attention. They’re all fed. They don’t have to hunt for their own food. Um, it takes them out of their natural habitat, but it also helps to preserve those animal.:
Speaker 5:
26:43
And I think I have another thought on why some teens report. It’s sad to see them because the taken out of their natural habitat and they’re shown on this and it’s like the showroom display, even though they’re taking care of, well, there was shown to the people and to the public and some teens might not like the fact that in that, so:
Speaker 3:
27:07
yeah. And I, and I buy that too. You know, one of the other things that zoos do is they raise awareness. Um, if the only place you can go to see a zoo as a particular species of animals, that it really drives home the point that we as human beings have really done a disservice to these animals in the wild. So interesting. Take 66% of young people report the death of a pet is the hardest part of owning a pet rather than caring for the pet. Uh, what are your thoughts on the death of a pad? How much of an impact does that have on you?:
Speaker 5:
27:48
I can definitely say the decile fluff for did make me very sad for probably a month. I still feel bad about it now. I can remember like a whole day at school where I couldn’t stop crying no matter what. But by the end of the day, I just try to accept it. I stopped crying, but I still felt bad.:
Speaker 3:
28:10
Yeah. And I’m, and I’m with on that. I mean, when I was a kid, we had this little monkey gorilla dog named rusty. I grew up with the dog. Uh, he was part of the family for sure. Um, you know, it was like having a family member pass away on us when, when he died. And it had a significant impact on me afterwards. Uh, in fact it was, you know, 20 some years before I was able to have another pedagogy after that cause I didn’t want to go through that again. So it does have a significant impact. Yeah. So the next that we have here is where the families get their pets. Uh, and there’s three key places that people get them in. The top one is at 24.8%. They get them from animal shelters. Uh, 21% get them from pet stores. And 18% are gifts from family members.:
Speaker 5:
29:12
No, I just want to say something. I don’t think we got any vote cats from any of these places.:
Speaker 3:
29:18
Um, except for Liotta. No. Right. Liotta Liotta came from an animal shelter. Uh, Dorothy came from the friend of a friend who’s cat had a litter and Doreen just sort of showed up on our doorstep and decided that she was born. Please.:
Speaker 5:
29:41
So we only got one cat. So one of my cats was from this.:
Speaker 3:
29:46
So of these three locations, what do you think would be the best place to get a pet from?:
Speaker 5:
29:53
I think the animal salt because you’re helping animals find a home. And like some, like I know in the past, like if an animal wasn’t adopted in a week, they’d have to put them down. It’s not like that now, but I just feel like they’re not as comfortable as being in a, in a pet store then an animal shelter. So it would be better to get it from an animal shelter.:
Speaker 3:
30:20
Right. And I agree. And you know, you’re helping the animal shelter out because if you adopt a pet from the animal shelter, then that’s an expense that they don’t have to continue to incur and they can go and save another animal, rescue another animal. It’s, I, the way I look at it is every time I, I rescue an animal from an animal shelter, that’s another animal off the street that that animal shelter can rescue. So, and, and ultimately it all pays itself forward. So we’ve talked about animals and our discussion has, um, circled around primarily cats and dogs and it was raining cats and dogs yesterday, so it’s appropriate, but, uh, they aren’t the only pets that people keep. So one of the other things that I thought would be interesting would be:
Speaker 5:
31:16
okay.:
Speaker 3:
31:16
Yes. Let’s look at how, you know, what proportion people keep different pets in. Yup. So the number one bet that people keep our dogs at 71%. That’s pretty high. Then you have fish. Uh, our 61% of the people had fish. Yup. Uh, and I, you know, I had fish at one point in time, Fisher fairly straight forward and easy to care for.:
Speaker 5:
31:41
When I went over to my friend Matt Maddie’s house, she actually had a whole tank full of fish. So how big was the tank? Um, I, yes. Uh, this cat times too, that the west and the height would probably be the height, the actually the height of the actual fan over there.:
Speaker 3:
32:08
Okay. So about four feet high? Probably about six feet long, I’m guessing.:
Speaker 5:
32:13
Well, not four feet high. Like, you know, the actual fan part.:
Speaker 3:
32:17
Oh, okay. So about two feet high and, okay. Yeah. So two by two by probably four, I’m guessing at that point:
Speaker 5:
32:26
she even had a few of tadpoles.:
Speaker 3:
32:28
Interesting. What kind of fish does she have?:
Speaker 5:
32:30
Um, I didn’t really get too big of a closer look. They were pretty small first. None of them were huge. I mean they had like natural plants and they actually had a bunch of little fish somewhere slightly bigger than others. But:
Speaker 3:
32:45
yeah. Interesting. I had a friend of mine once who kept Paranas. Now Paranas are pretty vicious. I mean, you look at their teeth, it looks like a saw blade and he used to have to keep a lid on it. And when he would feed them, he had a special door. He would drop the food and because they would leap out aggressively out of the water and if could leave out of the, uh, the tank. Um, but you know, he would drop pieces of meat in there and they would just tear it apart. It was, it was incredible. So, but we don’t have fish. We have cats and cats come in in our, uh, statistics here, third at 42%. Um, so:
Speaker 5:
33:33
I just want to say something, even though we have three cats, there’s also, um, Maddie, again, she said she had two cats. One of them was named potato. I didn’t get to see the other one when I was at her house. But potatoes basically like a male fatter version of Dorothy.:
Speaker 3:
33:51
Interesting. What’s the other cat named? Mashed,:
Speaker 5:
33:53
I dunno, daddy actually his full name is Irish potato, but they’re just calm potato.:
Speaker 3:
34:00
Nice. That’s an interesting name for an animal. Yeah. So number four on the list here is other, which is rather vague at 24%. Yeah. Uh, I’m guessing they’re probably some of the more exotic animals. Virgos right, right. Uh, then we have birds at 22%.:
Speaker 5:
34:21
Um, another thing is that my friend Wednesday, she has a bird. So yeah, I can relate to that.:
Speaker 3:
34:28
Well, and my friend Regina has a bird. She, she is, um, the fishing auto of exotic birds. What kind of bird does Lindsey have?:
Speaker 5:
34:38
I Dunno it, but it’s like a smaller bird with a bunch of different type of colors. Parakeet or something a parakeet. I’m, no, it’s like quite a small bird with a bunch of different colors. Mainly blue, yellow and green. And sometimes I would talk and they would always freak out in the cage whenever we, when we will, when all my friends were over. So:
Speaker 3:
35:00
okay. So 21% of people have rabbits and I used to have a friend of mine had rat rabbits. You would think rabbits are cute and cuddly. They’re really not. You know, they all the rabid always had to stay in its, it’s little habitat outside.:
Speaker 5:
35:17
But I would always be like sad when I would come home. This is when dot. Dorian Western Australia and she would leave us Ted Rabbit, sorry if he, if any rabbit lovers are listening. But:
Speaker 3:
35:30
yeah, Dorian had a tendency of of hunting some of the local rabbits and leaving them on our step as a donation. Yeah. And birds stolen get birds and birds as well. Yes. A hamster’s come in at 20% oh my friend Maddie has two hamsters. She’s got a zoo. I know there’s one animal. Doesn’t she have on this list?:
Speaker 5:
35:51
Well, she doesn’t have, she didn’t, she said she didn’t have a dog. Yeah, I’m sure she’ll get one soon though. Well Matt, well Lindsey actually told me that when she’s in middle school, have parents come and get her a dog. Okay, there you go. Um, she has fish. She has, she asked cats, uh, and she has hamsters.:
Speaker 3:
36:11
Okay, well I guess I can’t complain about our three cats then. Can I? Nope. So 7% of those polled said they never owned a pet. 6% on a horse. Who Do you know:
Speaker 5:
36:25
at Sally’s? That’s right. Yeah. Was quite a few horses. Shout out to aunt Sally for horses. Oh yeah. I’m actually going to have her own shadow. So, and sal, if you’re watching this, wait till the end.:
Speaker 3:
36:37
Uh, then at 5%, uh, we have snakes. Why did have to be snakes? I also heard some people after Angelo’s for title not get whatsoever. Some people do. We have a snake of as fairly sizable snake out in our yard somewhere. We’ve captured some pictures of it.:
Speaker 5:
36:54
Yeah. Unfortunately it hasn’t come in a while. So we,:
Speaker 3:
36:58
I would not classify it as a pet though. It’s a cohabitation of our, so, so 7% of people didn’t have pets. So the one thing that I thought would have been interesting with the beautiful find out why, so of those that didn’t have pets, 34%, the reason was my family was against owning pets. Um, and I guess for various reasons, medical reasons, cost reasons and so forth. Uh, 30% had allergies and 21% thing Pat’s cost too much. Mm. Um, and you know, over the lifetime of the pet, they can be expensive, but yeah. So are kids, but we keep kids around. Right. Yeah. So that was all we had on our statistics. So let’s move on to our next segment.:
Speaker 4:
37:56
Okay.:
Speaker 3:
37:58
So we’ve talked about down throughout the entire show, but now we will highlight our own paths here. So Madison, Jeremy, how many pets are you currently have?:
Speaker 5:
38:09
I currently have three pets. And what are they? Cats. They’re all cats. One’s a black tabby cat. He also wants dot Tammy. Oh, oh black. She’s a black short hair, domestic short hair. Domesticated cat. Right. We also have a great tabby. Right. Is she a tabby with short hair? I think she’s a tabby. Okay. A gray tabby named Dorian. And the black short haired cat is dark. Yes. And by you. And then we also have a black Kaliko called Yoda, black, white, Brown. And that’s always tan. Yeah. No Keller goes on there. Three codes and shields on the street. Colors are for.:
Speaker 3:
38:57
Okay. All right, well I’m going to set works then. What other pets have you had in the past?:
Speaker 5:
39:04
Well, I used to have two other cats when I was first born called, which was, there was a ginger tabby called Nala and a gray Calico, gray, white and probably a Lord’s hand. Calico called fluffer. We’ve talked about her before.:
Speaker 3:
39:20
We have, and uh, Nala was the elder cat when mommy and I met a Nala was a cat of some size. She, she was with Dallas, sat around the house. She sat around the house. Um, but she passed away before we even moved into the house. We’re in a fluffer keen with us to this house. Uh, she was the elder cat when we got the two younger ones, Dorothy and Liotta.:
Speaker 5:
39:53
I can definitely say that. Um, then came by and those two started like talking like between the door we have actual pictures of when fluffer and her were standing by the door together.:
Speaker 3:
40:09
Uh, so let me ask you this. Are Your pets actually pets or are they family? I’d say family and I think that’s, that’s very true.:
Speaker 5:
40:20
I mean like I probably cry when they died and I definitely see them as more family than pets.:
Speaker 3:
40:26
Yeah. Even even our existing cats down there, part of the family. And I think that’s really one of the key aspects of, of pets and generals. How close we get to them. Um, would you want more pets were the ones that you have pass away? Yes. Yes you would. That’s awesome.:
Speaker 5:
40:49
I mean, I don’t want to replace them. Well I don’t consider it a place in them. I mean, I’ve always thought of having a gender cat. And since Nala died when I was pretty young and I don’t really remember too much of her for some reason, I’m just, I would just always love to have a ginger tabby.:
Speaker 3:
41:06
Okay, well we’ll, we’ll, we’ll note that. We’ll take that under consideration. Yeah. I’m not sure if I’d be ready to have a cat. It’s, uh, you know, Dorothy passed away. I don’t think I’d be ready to have another cat for quite some time. And the irony is like, she wasn’t even supposed to be my cat. I didn’t want to get more cats. Um, Bobby wanted to get another cat and the only terms that I had was it had to be a black cat and I had to be able to name it. So we got a black cat and she was named Dorothy, not d. O. R. T. H. O. R. Y. Dorothy is in Darth Vader. Yeah. So that was:
Speaker 5:
41:50
basically Doris and then a y.:
Speaker 3:
41:53
Right. So, I don’t know. We’ll see. We’ll see how things work out. But, uh, we had hoped to have some of our pets join us in here. Unfortunately, they typically are not allowed in the studio. Um, and when we came in to start recording the ran out and we couldn’t get them back in. However, we do have a couple of standings. Um, you want to introduce your standings.:
Speaker 5:
42:15
All right, so the first day and then I got as kitty meow and we’ll probably have a little discussion on her in a little bit or like another podcast.:
Speaker 3:
42:28
Well we can, we can talk about her. I mean how long have you had that particular stuffed animal:
Speaker 5:
42:32
ever since I was born and we actually have three versions of her because like you said before you were going, you want to, like when I asked if we could, you had three different cats, one in different rooms and whenever I asked to bring Katie along on a trip, you guys had kitty might want to stay behind. And then when I got in the car was like magic, like kitty reappeared. And then, um, you would be like, oh look, can you decided to join us?:
Speaker 3:
43:01
You went full disclosure that was mommy magic all the way. She bought three of them at once because she knew that if you lost one you would be completely distraught. Yup. And you’ve had some significant adventures with kitty, which you know, you document in your,:
Speaker 4:
43:20
okay.:
Speaker 3:
43:20
What do you have a, a:
Speaker 5:
43:22
mommy’s Instagram account.:
Speaker 3:
43:24
Mommy’s got an Instagram Kat for, for the, for the kitty. Who’s your other stand in there? Okay.:
Speaker 5:
43:30
Um, she didn’t have a name but I had her for a while and um, I’ve played with her a bunch and she’s like the most realistic looking cat I could find. I haven’t done the namer yet, but she’s definitely been with me for a while now. And um, I just like to keep a lot of cat. Plus she’s, and when I was going through trying to donate stuff, she’s the only, she’s one of the ones I decided to keep cause well:
Speaker 3:
44:01
she’s one of the chosen ones. Yeah, she’s lucky. Okay. All right, well I think that largely covers everything we were going to talk about today. I think we’ll, uh, finish up with your closing remarks and your shall outs.:
Speaker 4:
44:20
Hmm.:
Speaker 3:
44:20
Go for Madison and closing remarks.:
Speaker 5:
44:23
Okay. So for my closing remarks today, I’m going to say that for people who don’t have a pet, I’d recommend getting one even if, if you’re allowed to or if it was, if it’s your choice to new would want to end, you’d wanted a pet, I’d recommend getting one. Um, it can be whatever pet you want it, you can choose. I really don’t know what’s the best pet, but I do want to say that anyone who does have a pet, I hope you’re happy with it and I hope you treat it like it’s family instead of just like another animal. Well, like in the wild, I always treat my cats and pets with care and respect and I hope all you do the same and I hope that, well, your pets are more families and they are pets. Any shadows today. Well, like I said before, aunt Sally, I just want to give her a shout out to her.:
Speaker 5:
45:21
Um, she has definitely been a great person to me. I’ve, I’ve been, I’ve even been able to ride some of her horses when ever I get to hang out with her. She also works with mommy at her job, so we’re pretty close with her. And, um, I just want to say that she’s definitely a role model for being caring to her pet, to her horses and other pets. She actually recently got a new dog and he’s actually really loving, knew her, and I’ve definitely heard stories from it. Her, I also want to give out a shout out to Maddie because she’s been able to keep:
Speaker 3:
46:07
Maddie the zookeeper.:
Speaker 5:
46:08
Yeah, the zookeeper. Uh, she’s been able to rescue a bunch of pets probably, but yeah.:
Speaker 3:
46:14
Okay, cool. I think that’s it for this week. Thank you for watching. And Madison, thank you for joining me today:
Speaker 5:
46:23
and thank you for having me.:
Speaker 3:
46:25
And, uh, we’ll be back next week with another great podcast.:
Speaker 1:
46:29
Yeah.:

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